Seminars

Institute of Cell Biology Seminar Series

 

Seminars are held on Mondays at 12.15pm until 8 April when they will be held at 12.00 noon and on Wednesdays in May at 12.00 noon

Everyone is welcome to attend.

Semester Two:  January - June 2019

 

Date

Speaker

Host

Venue

7 Jan 2019

Sophie Helaine

Department of Medicine,

Imperial College London

Elise Cachat

Daniel Rutherford Lecture Theatre G27

14 Jan 2019

Susanne Lens

Center for Molecular Medicine,

UMC Utrecht

Andrew Goryachev

Daniel Rutherford Lecture Theatre G27

21 Jan 2019

Julia de Rezende

Institute of Life and Earth Sciences, Heriot-Watt University

Andrew Free

Daniel Rutherford Lecture Theatre G27

28 Jan2019

Anthony Dodd

School of Biological Sciences, University of Bristol

Gerben van Ooijen

Daniel Rutherford Lecture Theatre G27

4 Feb 2019

Marcus Buschbeck

Josep Carreras Leukaemia Research Institute

Patrick Heun

Daniel Rutherford Lecture Theatre G27

11 Feb 2019

Karrera Y. Djoko

Department of Biosciences,

Durham University

Louise Horsfall

Daniel Rutherford Lecture Theatre G27

18 Feb 2019

Jerome Bonnet

CBS, CNRS, France

Baojun Wang

Daniel Rutherford Lecture Theatre G27

25 Feb 2019

Niko Geldner

Department of Plant Molecular Biology (DBMV), Université de Lausanne

Peter Doerner

Daniel Rutherford Lecture Theatre G27

4 March 2019

Federico Pelisch

Centre for Gene Regulation and Expression, School of Life Sciences, University of Dundee

Dhanya Cheerambathur Daniel Rutherford Lecture Theatre G27

**Friday** 

8 March 2019

Daniel Panne

Leicester Institute of Structural and Chemical Biology,

 University of Leicester

Marcus Wilson

Charles Waddington 

CHW 1.08

**11am**

18 March 2019

Amos Tanay

Epigenomics and Evolution,

Weizmann Institute of Science

Sara Buonomo

Daniel Rutherford Lecture Theatre G27

25 March 2019

Angela Hay

Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research

Andrew Hudson

Daniel Rutherford Lecture Theatre G27

1 April 2019

Hongtao Yu

Medical Center, UT Southwestern

Adele Marston

Daniel Rutherford Lecture Theatre G27

8 April 2019

Julien Dumont

Cell Division and Reproduction,

Institut Jacques-Monod

Julie Welburn

Daniel Rutherford Lecture Theatre G27

15 April 2019

NO SEMINAR - EASTER HOLIDAY

 

 

 

22 April 2019

NO SEMINAR - EASTER MONDAY

 

 

29 April 2019

tbc

 

Daniel Rutherford Lecture Theatre G27

Wednesday

1 May 2019

Emmanuel Derivery

MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge

Ben Craske

Julie Welburn

Daniel Rutherford Lecture Theatre G27

Wednesday

8 May 2019

No Seminar – Centre Retreat

 

 

Wednesday

15 May 2019

Jeroen Krijgsveld

German Cancer Research Centre, Heidelberg

Stefania del Prete

Philipp Voigt

Daniel Rutherford Lecture Theatre G27

Wednesday

22 May 2019

Tim Nott

University of Oxford

Georg Kustatscher

Juri Rappsilber

Daniel Rutherford Lecture Theatre G27

Wednesday

29 May 2019

Karsten Weis

Institute of Biochemistry, ETH Zurich

Vadim Shchepachev

David Tollervey

Daniel Rutherford Lecture Theatre G27

3 June 2019

 David Pellman

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute,

 Harvard Medical School

Bill Earnshaw

Daniel Rutherford Lecture Theatre G27

10 June 2019

Jeremy Carlton

Organelle Dynamics Laboratory,

Crick Institute

Julie Welburn

S7.20, Michael Swann Building

17 June 2019

Tineke Lenstra

Division Gene Regulation,

The Netherlands Cancer Institute

Edward Wallace

Daniel Rutherford Lecture Theatre G27

24 June 2019

Nathalie Verbruggen

Plant Physiology and Molecular Genetics, Faculté des Sciences, Universite Libre de Bruxelle

Gerben van Ooijen

Daniel Rutherford Lecture Theatre G27

 

Seminar details (including ad hoc seminars)

Date Event
29th May 2019
12:00
Daniel Rutherford Building
G.27, Lecture Theatre

Professor Dr Karsten Weis, Institute of Biochemistry, ETH, Zurich

Wellcome Centre Seminar - The life of an mRNA - from birth to death

The ability of proteins and nucleic acids to undergo liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) has recently emerged as an important molecular principle of how cells rapidly and reversibly compartmentalise their components into membraneless organelles such as the nucleolus, processing bodies or stress granules. How the assembly and turnover of these organelles is controlled, and how these biological condensates selectively recruit or release components is poorly understood.  

I present results demonstrating that members of the large and highly abundant family of RNA-dependent DEAD-box ATPases (DDXs) are global regulators of RNA-containing phase-separated organelles in pro- and eukaryotes. Using in vitro reconstitution and in vivo experiments we can show that DDXs promote phase separation in their ATP-bound form, and ATP hydrolysis induces compartment turnover and RNA release. This mechanism of membraneless organelle regulation reveals a novel principle of cellular organisation that is conserved from bacteria to man. We further show that DDXs control RNA flux between phase-separated organelles, and thus propose that a cellular network of dynamic, DDX-controlled compartments establishes biochemical reaction centres that affords cells spatial and temporal control of various RNA processing steps regulating the composition and fate of ribonucleoprotein particles.

Host: Vadim Shchepachev and David Tollervey


22nd May 2019
12:00
Daniel Rutherford Building
G.27 Lecture Theatre

Dr Tim Nott - Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford

Wellcome Centre Seminar - Emergent properties of liquid-like membraneless organelles

Condensation of cellular material into phase-separated liquid-like droplets has emerged as a fundamental new organising principle in cell biology. The dynamic and membraneless compartments formed in this way are predominantly associated with processing nucleic acids and are indispensable for cellular function. Surprisingly, we know little about the solvent environment inside these and other cellular bodies, yet it is likely to have a significant influence on the biochemical reactions that take place within them.

One important class of enzymes that are biochemically active inside membraneless organelles are DNA and RNA helicases, which remodel the structures of nucleic acids. In addition to ATP-dependent catalytic domains, several helicases possess intrinsically disordered regions that readily undergo liquid-liquid phase separation in cells and in vitro. We have recently found that model membraneless organelles reconstituted from only the disordered tails of the DEADbox helicase Ddx4 display emergent biochemical properties. Among these are the ability to selectively absorb RNAs based on their structure, and the destabilisation of nucleic acid duplexes. We hypothesise that in the context of a membraneless organelle, these properties could complement the catalytic activity of the helicase domain.

Here we show that the emergent biochemical properties of membraneless organelles formed from only the disordered tails of DEADbox RNA helicases can be tuned by their amino acid sequence, and subtle changes to their surrounding environment. These results suggest novel ways in which cells could modulate the intrinsic properties of membraneless organelle interiors to achieve specific biochemical outcomes.


Host: Georg Kustatscher and Juri Rappsilber


15th May 2019
12:00
Daniel Rutherford Building
G.27 Lecture Theatre

Dr Jeroen Krijgsveld - German Cancer Research Centre, Heidelberg

Wellcome Centre Seminar - Protein networks with RNA and chromatin: encounters that open up a new world

Proteins rarely act alone, and they are well-known to assemble into complexes to fulfill their function. In addition, they interact with DNA and RNA in intricate ways to shape the epigenetic machinery, regulate gene expression, and control translation, however studying this in a systematic manner has remained a challenge. In this presentation I will describe novel proteomic methodologies that we developed to examine protein interactions in the context of chromatin, and to chart protein-RNA interactions across all RNA biotypes. Furthermore, I will show novel insights that we gained by investigating how the identified networks change in the face of stress and cell state transition.

Host: Stefania del Prete and Philipp Voigt


1st May 2019
12:00
Daniel Rutherford Building
G.27 Lecture Theatre

Dr Emmanuel Derivery - MRC LMB, Cambridge

Wellcome Centre Seminar - Polarized trafficking during asymmetric cell division

Asymmetric cell division gives rise to two daughter cells, which inherit different determinants, thereby acquiring different fates. The asymmetric sorting of signalling endosomes from the central spindle has recently emerged as an important feature of asymmetric cell division contributing to differential cell fate assignation. However, this phenomenon is poorly understood at the molecular level, notably in terms of cytoskeleton.  We have identified a new player, the Elongator complex, which is a multi-subunit complex localized at the central spindle that binds microtubules in vivo, controlling central spindle asymmetry and Sara endosomes asymmetric segregation in Drosophila Sensory Organ Precursors. Since these endosomes contain the cell fate determinants Notch and its receptor Delta, this contributes to asymmetric signalling and thereby cell fate. Moreover, the in vitro experiments show that Elongator complex has a direct effect on microtubule is able to directly bind to microtubules, modulating its dynamics and stability in vitro, and that Elp4 is the subunit responsible for this. Together, this data suggests that that the Elongator complex asymmetrically stabilizes microtubules on one side of the central spindle, playing a major role in linking the signalling complexes polarity signals present at the membrane with the cytosol, asymmetrically stabilizing the central spindle, and thus controlling cell fate during in Drosophila Sensory Organ Precursors development.

Host: Ben Craske and Julie Welburn